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 Post subject: Re: Chef/kitchen knives
PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:06 pm
Posts: 1851
Location: Washington
naz wrote:
I am a knife maker. I use sand paper on glass blocks for blade shaping. At least after i am done with the grinders. Glass blocks are a true surface and stay flat as you grind. And you can put just about any grit on them. When making blades, i simply polish the bevel and get a sharp edge with it. If i am sharpening an already made knife, i use a 1000 grit ceramic stone. They're a very good balance and easy to put an edge on a knife with, assuming the knife isn't damaged.

The bevel is more important than the sharpening. Solid bevels are generally ideal for cheff's knives. My experience has been that convex bevels are best for universal applications. But i guess it's a matter of preference. A properly done convex bevel gives significantly better cutting power than anything you are going to find at the hardware store. It's what the Japanese samurai and European knights had on their swords. But it isn't quick or easy to make.


I agree, though I prefer a good diamond bench stone to abrasive papers if I have one in the grit range.

I disagree on the last point you made though. There was a lot of variety in edge geometry among both Japanese and European swords, even among types. The better ones generally did have only a single primary bevel but secondary bevels were prolific too. It was common for many types of swords to be fielded with a complete primary bevel, and only given the secondary bevel shortly before battle to reduce the risk of edge damage during travel. Further, hollow ground blades were common, and that's far too fragile if done in only a single grind.

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 Post subject: Re: Chef/kitchen knives
PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 7:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 6:07 am
Posts: 90
Location: Land of the wiggle face (Alaska)
GunFun wrote:
naz wrote:
I am a knife maker. I use sand paper on glass blocks for blade shaping. At least after i am done with the grinders. Glass blocks are a true surface and stay flat as you grind. And you can put just about any grit on them. When making blades, i simply polish the bevel and get a sharp edge with it. If i am sharpening an already made knife, i use a 1000 grit ceramic stone. They're a very good balance and easy to put an edge on a knife with, assuming the knife isn't damaged.

The bevel is more important than the sharpening. Solid bevels are generally ideal for cheff's knives. My experience has been that convex bevels are best for universal applications. But i guess it's a matter of preference. A properly done convex bevel gives significantly better cutting power than anything you are going to find at the hardware store. It's what the Japanese samurai and European knights had on their swords. But it isn't quick or easy to make.


I agree, though I prefer a good diamond bench stone to abrasive papers if I have one in the grit range.

I disagree on the last point you made though. There was a lot of variety in edge geometry among both Japanese and European swords, even among types. The better ones generally did have only a single primary bevel but secondary bevels were prolific too. It was common for many types of swords to be fielded with a complete primary bevel, and only given the secondary bevel shortly before battle to reduce the risk of edge damage during travel. Further, hollow ground blades were common, and that's far too fragile if done in only a single grind.


I was referring to the standards as a general example. But yes, you are correct. It seams there was more variety back then, then there is now.


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 Post subject: Re: Chef/kitchen knives
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2021 5:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 22, 2020 6:07 am
Posts: 90
Location: Land of the wiggle face (Alaska)
I recently started scratch building a large "Michael Meyers" size chef's knife. I will share photos of the progress and finished product if you like.


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 Post subject: Re: Chef/kitchen knives
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2021 11:03 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:16 pm
Posts: 2013
Please do!


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